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Diet Therapy of Diseases

Diet Therapy of DiseasesGeneral Research

KETOGENIC DIET – ASTONISHING WAY TO LOOSE WEIGHT

ketogenic diet
A client of mine asked for details of a ketogenic diet. Personally I don’t subscribe to the idea of taking lots of fat while trying to lose fat supposedly. I figured it portends more harm than good for the patient; especially in Nigeria where unsaturated fats sources (which are most ideal for a ketogenic diet) are not really available and expensive when found. So I decided to get comprehensive components, advantages and disadvantages of the diet, so let us talk about it shall we? This is quite comprehensive so kindly forgive it’s lengthy nature.

ketogenic diet

Definition:

A ketogenic diet (keto) is basically a low-carb diet, which turns the body into a fat-burner. It is similar to other strict low-carb diets, like the Atkins diet or LCHF (low carb, high fat). These diets often end up being ketogenic more or less by accident. The main difference between strict LCHF and keto is that protein is restricted in the latter. A keto diet is designed specifically to result in ketosis.

What is Ketosis?

The “keto” in a ketogenic diet comes from the fact that it makes the body produce small fuel molecules called “ketones”
This is an alternative fuel for the body, used when blood sugar (glucose) is in short supply.
Ketones are produced if you eat very few carbs (that are quickly broken down into blood sugar) and only moderate amounts of protein (excess protein can also be converted to glucose). Ketones are produced in the liver, from fat. They are then used as fuel throughout the body, including the brain. The brain is a hungry organ that consumes lots of energy every day and it can’t run on fat directly. It can only run on glucose or ketones.
ketones
On a ketogenic diet the entire body switches its fuel supply to run almost entirely on fat. Insulin levels become very low and fat burning increases drastically. It becomes easy to access fat stores to burn them off. This is obviously great if the aim is to lose weight, but there are also other less obvious benefits, like less hunger and a steady supply of energy. Therefore when the body produces ketones it’s said to be in ketosis. The fastest way to get there is by fasting – not eating anything – but obviously it’s not possible to fast forever.

Ketogenic Diet:

A ketogenic diet is one that forces your body to go into ketogenic state. It has many of the benefits of fasting – including weight loss – without having to fast.
There are several versions of the ketogenic diet, including:
Standard ketogenic diet (SKD):
This is a very low-carb, moderate-protein and high-fat diet. It usually contains 75% fat, 20% protein and only 5% carbs.
Cyclical ketogenic diet (CKD):
This diet involves periods of higher-carb refeeds, such as 5 ketogenic days followed by 2 high-carb days.
Targeted ketogenic diet (TKD):
This diet allows you to add carbohydrates around workouts periods only.
 
High-protein ketogenic diet:
This is similar to a standard ketogenic diet, but includes more protein. The ratio is often 60% fat, 35% protein and 5% carbs.

How to Achieve Ketosis

 
There are many things that increase levels of ketones and ketosis. Here they are, from most to least important:
Restrict carbohydrates to 20 digestible grams per day or less – a strict low-carb diet. Fiber does not have to be restricted, it is beneficial to reduce glycemic index and increase satiety.
Restrict protein to moderate levels. If possible stay at or below 1 gram of protein per day per kg of body weight. So about 70 grams of protein per day if you weigh 70 kg (154 pounds). It might be beneficial to lower protein intake even more, especially when you’re overweight, and then aim for 1 gram of protein per kg of desired weight. The most common mistake that stops people from reaching optimal ketosis is too much protein.
 
Eat enough fat to feel satisfied. This is the big difference between a ketogenic diet and starvation, that also results in ketosis. A ketogenic diet is sustainable, starvation is not.
Avoid snacking when not hungry. Unnecessary snacking slows weight loss and reduces ketosis.
If necessary add intermittent fasting. This is very effective at boosting ketone levels, as well as accelerating weight loss and type 2 diabetes reversal.
The Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet
The benefits that accompany a ketogenic diet are similar to those of any strict low-carb diet. However, the effect might be even greater since protein is more restricted. This raises ketones more, and lowers insulin (the fat-storing hormone) more.

Weight loss:

 
Turning your body into a fat-burning machine has obvious benefits for weight loss. Fat burning is vastly increased while insulin – the fat storing hormone – levels drop greatly. This creates ideal circumstances in which fat loss can occur, without hunger. Around 20 scientific studies of the highest class (RCTs) show that, compared to other diets, low-carbohydratee and ketogenic diets result in more effective weight loss.
Diabetes type 2 reversal:
 
A ketogenic diet is excellent for reversing type 2 diabetes, since it lowers blood sugar levels and the negative impact of high insulin levels.
Improved mental focus:
 
Ketosis results in a steady flow of fuel (ketones) to the brain. A ketogenic diet prevents sharp fluctuations in blood glucose. This often results in the experience of increased focus and improved concentration. A lot of people specifically use keto diets specifically for increased mental performance.
Interestingly, there’s a common misperception that eating lots of carbohydrates is needed for proper brain function. But this is only true when ketones are not available. After a few days (up to a week) of keto-adaptation – during which people may experience some difficulty concentrating, have headaches and become easily irritated – the body and brain can run effortlessly on ketones. In this state many people experience more energy and improved mental focus.

Increased Physical Endurance:

 ketogenic diet
Ketogenic diets can vastly increase physical endurance, by giving constant access to all the energy of fat stores. The body’s supply of stored carbohydrates (glycogen) only lasts for a couple of hours of intense exercise, or less. But your fat stores carry enough energy to easily last for weeks or even months.
When you’re adapted to burning primarily carbohydrates – like most people are today – fat stores are not easily available, and they can’t fuel the brain. This results in constantly having to fill up by eating before, during and after longer exercise sessions. Or even just to fuel daily activities and avoid “hanger” (hungry and irritable states). On a ketogenic diet this problem is solved. As the body and brain can easily be fueled 24/7 by your powerful and abundant fat stores, you can keep going forever like the Energizer Bunny (lol, I kid). Whether you are competing in a physical endurance event, or just trying to stay focused on reaching some other goal, your body has the fuel it needs to keep you going and going even without a carbohydrate fill up.

Two problems

So how is it possible that most people believe that carbs are necessary to perform exercise? There are two reasons. To unlock the power of ketogenic diets for physical endurance, and not instead suffer reduced performance, you need:
*Enough fluid and salt (minerals and vitamins) for fluid and electrolyte replacement;
*Two weeks of adaptation to burning fat – it does not happen instantly.

Metabolic syndrome:

 
There are many studies showing that low-carb diets improve markers of metabolic syndrome such as blood lipids, insulin levels, HDL-cholesterol, LDL particle size and fasting blood sugar levels. Improvements have been shown to be even greater when carbohydrates and protein are restricted to the point of being steadily in nutritional ketosis.

Epilepsy:

 
The ketogenic diet is a proven medical therapy for epilepsy that has been used since the 1920s. Traditionally it has mainly been used in children with uncontrolled epilepsy despite medication. More recently it has also been tested successfully by adults with epilepsy, with similar good results. There are many randomized controlled trials that demonstrate the effectiveness of the ketogenic diet in decreasing seizures in patients with epilepsy.
Using a ketogenic diet in epilepsy is that usually allows people to take less anti-epileptic drugs, while remaining seizure-free. It’s not unusual to even be able to completely stop taking these drugs while staying seizure-free. As all anti-seizure medications have side effects – like drowsiness, reduced concentration, personality changes or even reduced IQ – being able to take less or no drugs can be hugely beneficial.
Myelin sheathes which are the connecting points of neurons are made up primarily of fats. This may explain why a high fat diet would cause a positive improvement on a neurological disorder.

Other benefits of the ketogenic diet includes:

Reduced hunger:
ketogenc diet
Many people experience a marked reduction in hunger. This may possibly be caused by an increased ability of the body to be fueled by its fat stores. Many people feel great while eating just once or twice a day, automatically ending up doing a form of intermittent fasting. This saves both time and money, while also speeding up weight loss.

Increased energy:

Perhaps after a few days of feeling tired (the “keto flu“) many people experience a clear increase in energy levels. This can also be experienced as clear thinking, a lack of “brain fog” or even as a sense of euphoria.

Protein Sparing Effect:

Ketosis has a protein-sparing effect, assuming that one consumes adequate quantities of protein and calories—0.7 grams per kg of body weight per day—in the first place.Once in ketosis, the body actually prefers ketones to glucose. Since the body has copious quantities of fat, this means there is no need to oxidize protein to generate glucose through gluconeogenesis.

Reduction in Blood Insulin Level:

ketogenic diet

Another benefit has to do with the low levels of insulin in the body, which causes greater lipolysis and free-glycerol release compared to a normal diet when insulin is around 80-120 mmol/dm. Insulin has a lipolysis-blocking effect, which can inhibit the use of fatty acids as energy. Also, when insulin is brought to low levels, beneficial hormones are released in the body, such as growth hormone and other powerful growth factors.
Low Appetite:
Another small but very important benefit of the ketogenic diet is that when in the state of ketosis, ketones, along with a high protein intake, seem to suppress appetite. A high-carbohydrate diet, on the other hand, increases hunger levels. Because you have to consume a lot of fat on a ketogenic diet, which hold 9 calories per gram, you are not getting much food volume. It’s not mandatory to be hungry on a reduced-calorie diet.
What About The Anticatabolic Effects Of The Ketogenic Diet?
Every reduced-calorie diet is catabolic, meaning the diet can cause initiate muscle break down. ‘This is largely due to the fact that you are consuming less energy, so your body relies on other tissue (i.e., protein) to serve as an energy source. Added to that, some dieters do copious amounts of aerobic exercise when dieting, which can cause further breakdown of muscle. The brain can also call on protein to create more glucose for energy needs—a process called gluconeogenesis.
Ketosis is different, because, when in the state of ketosis, the brain will prefer ketones over glucose. For the dieter this is good! The body will not have to break down protein for energy. In turn the body will be forced to use its fat reserves, a.k.a. your love handles, for its energy. This is why a low-carb diet is such a good method of dieting.
Where Is The Scientific Data?
Fatty acid production in fat tissue is stimulated by epinephrine and glucagon, and inhibited by insulin. Insulin is one of the hormones the pancreas secretes in the presence of carbohydrates. Insulin’s purpose is to keep blood glucose levels in check by acting like a driver, pushing the glucose into cells. If insulin were not to be secreted, blood glucose levels would get out of control.
Glucagon is on the other side of the spectrum; it is insulin’s antagonistic hormone. Glucagon is also secreted by the pancreas when glucose levels fall too low. This usually happens when a person skips meals, or does not consume adequate amounts of carbohydrates for an extended period of time. When this happens, glucagon is secreted by the pancreas to break down stored glycogen in the liver into a more usable form, glucose.
When the body’s glycogen stores begin to get depleted, rates of beta-oxidation increase, resulting in the mobilization of free fatty acids from fat tissue. This is where the metabolic state of ketosis comes in. During beta-oxidation, ketone bodies are released from the liver—because they cannot be utilized by the liver—and travel to the brain to be used for fuel. The free fatty acids can then be turned into a usable energy substrate.
Potential Side Effects of Ketosis
Can ketones get too high, dangerously high? Not under normal circumstances.
For most people it’s quite a challenge to even get to optimal ketosis. Getting into dangerously high ketone levels (more than 8 – 10 mmol/l) is most often simply impossible. The main exception is type 1 diabetes, where the pancreas does not produce enough insulin. In type 1 diabetes, it’s very possible to get dangerously high ketone levels – just by forgetting to take your insulin injection. There are also other situations like breastfeeding and taking type 2 diabetes medications called SGLT-2 inhibitors25 that in rare situations can result in too high ketone levels.
This will result in feeling sick, nauseous and very weak. It can lead to a life-threatening condition called ketoacidosis. There’s a simple treatment if you suspect this may be happening: eat some carbohydrates right away (e.g. a couple of fruits or a sandwich, a soft drink or a glass of juice). If you have type 1 diabetes take more insulin. Then contact emergency medical services if you do not immediately start feeling better.
Dry mouth and Increased thirst:

Unless you drink enough and get enough electrolytes (minerals and vitamins), you may feel a dry mouth. Try a cup of tea or two daily, plus as much water as you need.

Increased urination:
Another ketone body, acetoacetate, can end up in the urine. This makes it possible to test for ketosis using urine strips. It also – at least at startup – can result in having to go to the bathroom more often (Polyuria). This is the main cause of the increased thirst (above).

Keto breath:

This is due to a ketone body called acetone escaping via our breath. It can make a person’s breath smell “fruity”, or similar to nail polish remover. This smell can sometimes also be perceived from sweat, when working out. It’s often a temporary situation.
The Keto Flu:
While ketosis is normally safe, it is common to experience some time-limited side effects.
People transitioning from sugar-burning to fat-burning mode often initially experience a side effect referred to as the keto flu, since symptoms are similar to those of the flu: fatigue, nausea, headaches, cramps, etc. There are two main therapies that can prevent or alleviate these symptoms:
  1. Drink water with salt and lemon – alternatively have a daily cup of bouillon.
  2. Gradually reduce carbohydrate intake – abrupt abstinence results in severity and duration of symptoms. When starting on a ketogenic diet, it is typical to experience both fuid and electrolyte loss. This occurs because carbohydrates retain water and salts in the body, so when you stop eating carbs your body loses this water. If the keto flu is happening due to too little hydration, it might help to drink a glass of salt water with a little bit of squeezed lemon (for taste). When carbohydrates are suddenly removed from the diet, the brain can run slightly low on energy before it learns to use ketone bodies for fuel instead of the usual glucose. This means that if you drastically reduce carbs from one day to another, you may get symptoms of such as tiredness, nausea and headaches. Replacing fluids and electrolytes as described above can alleviate the symptoms. Or by instead gradually lowering carb intake over a period of a week or more, the body gets used to burning fat and ketones instead of glucose and there will usually be no symptoms. If you do not wish to gradually reduce carbs, make sure to get enough fluid and salt (like 1-2 cups of bouillon per day) to minimize symptoms. After a week or so the body is usually adapted to a ketogenic diet.
Blood Lipid Profile:
Blood-lipid profile is also a concern on the ketogenic diet due to the staggering amounts of saturated fats in the diet, although the diet can be centered around healthier unsaturated fats—which isn’t as fun as eating an egg and cheese omelet, fried in butter, with bacon on the side.
This is still under debate though as various people get different results during a ketogenic diet; some people following the ketogenic diet will experience a drop in cholesterol levels, but for some people, cholesterol levels will increase.
Micronutrient Deficiencies:
In a ketogenic diet regimen, carbohydrates are restricted to less than 50 grams a day, therefore micronutrient deficiencies could occur. Thiamin, folate, calcium, iron, potassium, and magnesium are typically inadequate in low-carb diets because grains which are major source of these micronutrients are restricted. The best thing to do to avoid this is to make sure you take high-quality multivitamin supplements to ensure 100 percent supply of the daily recommended values. Also supplementing with a fiber supplement is a good idea to make sure your plumbing doesn’t get clogged.
Ketoacidosis:
Ketoacidosis occurs when the level of ketones in the blood gets out of control, which poses a severe health risk especially for diabetics. When massive quantities of ketones are produced, the pH level of the blood drops, creating a high-acidic environment. Non-diabetics need not fear, as the regulated and controlled production of ketone bodies allows the blood pH to remain within normal limits.
 

Foods to Avoid:

Any food that is high in carbohydrates should be limited. Here is a list of foods that need to be reduced or eliminated on a ketogenic diet:
  • Sugary foods: Soda, fruit juice, smoothies, cake, ice cream, candy, etc.
  • Grains or starches: Wheat-based products, rice, pasta, cereal, etc.
  • Fruit: All fruit, except small portions of berries like strawberries.
  • Beans or legumes: Peas, kidney beans, lentils, chickpeas, etc.
  • Root vegetables and tubers: Potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, parsnips, etc.
  • Some condiments or sauces:Especially those that contain sugar and saturated fat.
  • Unhealthy fat: Limit your intake of processed vegetable oils, mayonnaise, etc.
  • Alcohol: Due to its high empty calorie content, many alcoholic beverages (if not all) can throw you out of ketosis.
  • Sugar-free diet foods: These are often high in synthetic sugars, which can affect ketone levels in some cases. These foods are also usually highly processed.

Foods Allowed:

You should base the majority of your meals around these foods:
  • Meat: Red meat, steak, ham, sausage, bacon, chicken and turkey.
  • Fatty fish: Such as salmon, trout, tuna and mackerel. These fishes are high in omegaa 3 fatty acids which are quite heart healthy.
  • Eggs: Look for pastured or whole eggs.
  • Cheese: Unprocessed cheese (cheddar, goat, cream, blue or mozzarella).
  • Nuts and seeds: Almonds, cashew nuts, walnuts, flaxseeds, pumpkin seeds, chia seeds, etc.
  • Healthy oils: Primarily extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil and avocado oil.
  • Avocados: Whole avocados or freshly made guacamole.
  • Low-carb veggies: Most green veggies, tomatoes, onions, peppers, etc.
  • Many keto activists advise that number to be 30 grams of carbohydrates but most individuals can still maintain ketosis while consuming the 50 grams and this allows for a little more leeway in the diet since you can increase the consumption of vegetables and a variety of flavoring’s that contain a few grams of carbohydrates.
  • Condiments: You can use salt, pepper and various healthy herbs and spices.
Sources:
The Art and Science of Low-Carbohydrate Performance by Stephen Phinney and Jeff Volek.
https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/keto
read more
Diet Therapy of Diseases

STRESS AND NUTRITION: THE CONNECTION

A colleague of mine requested for an article on stress and I thought we could all learn from it. It contains virtually a little of everything you would need to know on the connection between stress and nutrition. I guarantee you would have lots of fun. Let’s go!

Stress and the Body

Being aware of how your body works and deals with stress can help you to manage stress and stressful situations. After a stressful period the human body can go into a ‘recovery mode’ where increased appetite and food cravings become more prevalent. At the same time metabolic rates drop to conserve energy. Being aware of these patterns can help you manage your stress levels and through nutrition and diet you can help your body recover from stressful periods more rapidly and minimise negative effects like weight gain.

Cortisol and Stress

Of course we know that stress can affect your body in many ways and that your waistline is a particularly notable victim of stress. Sadly, this is true. There are several ways in which stress can contribute to weight gain. One has to do with cortisol, also known as the stress hormone. When we’re under stress, the fight or flight response is triggered in our bodies, leading to the release of various hormones, including cortisol. When there is more cortisol in our system, we may crave less healthy food options such as snacks containing high sugar and fat content, and this can adversely affect our nutrition and health.
Whether we’re stressed because of constant, crazy demands at work or we’re really in danger, our bodies respond like we’re about to be harmed and need to fight for our lives. To answer this need, that body experiences a burst of energy, shifts in metabolism and blood flow, and other changes.These changes can affect digestion, appetite, and nutrition in many ways.
What happens during stress?
When we go through stress, our nervous system and adrenal glands send signals to the rest of the body to help us think more clearly and be ready for a physical response if required. In effect, cortisol and adrenaline are secreted. Cortisol is chiefly known as the body’s stress hormone. Let’s take an indept look at cortisol and how it functions in relation with our diet.
 
What is Cortisol?
Cortisol is a glucocorticoid (steroid hormone) produced from cholesterol in the two adrenal glands located on top of each kidney. It is normally released in response to events and circumstances such as waking up in the morning, exercising, and acute stress. Cortisol’s far-reaching, systemic effects play many roles in the body’s effort to carry out its processes and maintain balance (homeostasis) .Cortisol curbs functions that would be nonessential or detrimental in a fight-or-flight situation as detected by adrenaline. It alters immune system responses and suppresses the digestive system, the reproductive system and growth processes. This complex natural alarm system also communicates with regions of your brain that control mood, motivation and fear.

 

However in modern life we can become stressed for many reasons other than impending danger and yet our bodily reactions are the same. With their pre-determined instincts, our bodies’ still prepare our minds in this instinctive way and give less priority to other, less urgent, functions. Digestion is one such function that is given a lower priority during stressful situations, this is not good as poor digestion can make us feel unwell and this in turn can be a source of stress.
Why is cortisol so important?
 
Cortisol accelerates the breakdown of proteins into amino acids (except in liver cells). These amino acids move out of the tissues into the blood and to liver cells, where they are changed to glucose in a process called gluconeogenesis. A prolonged high blood concentration of cortisol in the blood results in a net loss of tissue proteins and higher levels of blood glucose.
Isn’t this bad?
 
Not exactly. By raising plasma glucose levels, cortisol provides the body with the energy it requires to combat stress from trauma, illness, fright, infection, bleeding, etc.
Obviously, this is bad from a muscle breakdown perspective; however, the body is simply trying to preserve carbohydrate stores and deliver energy when it needs it most. Acutely, cortisol also mobilizes fatty acids from fat cells and even helps to maintain blood pressure.
As it’s part of inflammatory response, cortisol is necessary for recovery from injury and healing. However, chronically high levels of cortisol in the blood can decrease white blood cells and antibody formation, which can lower immunity. This is the most important therapeutic property of glucocorticoids, since they can reduce the inflammatory response and this, in itself, suppresses immunity.
Thus, cortisol is:
*Protein-mobilizing
*Gluconeogenic
*Hyperglycemic
Whether these effects are “good” or “bad” depends on whether cortisol’s release is acute (ie brief and infrequent) or chronic (i.e continuous).

Understanding the Natural Stress Response

When a threat is perceived the hypothalamus, a tiny region at the base of the brain, sets off an alarm system in the body. Through a combination of nerve and hormonal signals, this system prompts the adrenal glands, located atop the kidneys, to release a surge of hormones, including adrenaline and cortisol.
Adrenaline increases heart rate, elevates blood pressure and boosts energy supplies. Cortisol, the primary stress hormone, increases sugars (glucose) in the bloodstream, enhances brain’s use of glucose and increases the availability of substances that repair tissues.
Of interest to the dietetics community, cortisol also plays an important role in human nutrition. It regulates energy by selecting the right type and amount of substrate (carbohydrate, fat, or protein) the body needs to meet the physiological demands placed on it. When chronically elevated, cortisol can have deleterious effects on weight, immune function, and chronic disease risk.
Stress and Nutrition: The Connection
 
Blood Sugar:
 
Prolonged stress can alter blood sugar levels, causing mood swings, fatigue, and conditions like hyperglycemia. Too much stress has even been linked to metabolic syndrome, a cluster of health concerns that can lead to greater health problems, like heart attacks and diabetes.
 
Fat Storage:
Excessive stress affects fat storage. Higher levels of stress are linked to greater levels of abdominal fat. Unfortunately, abdominal fat is not only aesthetically undesirable, it’s linked with greater health risks than fat stored in other areas of the body and high risk of cardiovascular diseases.
Emotional Eating:
 
Increased levels of cortisol can not only make you crave unhealthy food, but excess nervous energy can often cause you to eat more than you normally would. How many times have you found yourself scouring the kitchen for a snack, or absently munching on junk food when you’re stressed, but not really hungry?
Fast Food:

stress and nutrition

Experts believe that one of the big reasons obesity is on the rise in our society these days is that people are too stressed and busy to make healthy dinners at home, often opting to get fast foods instead. Fast food and even healthier restaurant choices can both be higher in sugar and fat. Even in the healthiest circumstances, you don’t know what you’re eating when you’re not eating at home, and can’t control what goes into your food. Because of this and because restaurants often add less healthy ingredients like butter to enhance taste, it’s safer to eat at home.
 
Too Busy to Exercise

 

With all the demands of our schedules, exercise may be one of the last things on your to-do list. If so, you’re not alone. Unfortunately, from sitting in traffic, clocking hours at our desks, and plopping in front of the TV in exhaustion at the end of the day, exercise often goes by the wayside.
Caffeine and Stress

 

Caffeine is found mostly in coffee, tea, some soft drinks and chocolate. It can have negative effects on the body if taken in high quantities and habitually. Caffeine is a neurostimullator which increases heartbeat and keeps the mind alert. This makes it difficult for people taking coffee to sleep properly or even relax. Soon enough the body gets tired but still can’t go to sleep. Getting adequate sleep is an important factor in reducing stress levels. Caffeine and stress can both elevate cortisol levels, high amounts of caffeine ( which on its own can cause stress) can lead to the negative health effects associated with prolonged elevated levels of cortisol. When one ingests high levels of caffeine, you feel a mood surge and plummet, leaving a craving for more caffeine to make it soar again. This leads to insomnia, some other health consequences (such as arrhythmia) and, of course, stress. However, small to moderate amounts of caffeine can lift your mood and give you a boost.
Effects on the Body:

 

Hormones- You can feel the effects of caffeine in your system within a few minutes of ingesting it, and it stays on your system for many hours—it has a half-life of four to six hours in your body. While in the body, caffeine affects the following hormones thereby causing stress:
Adenosine: Caffeine can inhibit absorption of adenosine, which calms the body. This makes you feel alert in the short run, but can cause sleep problems later.
Adrenaline:Caffeine releases adrenaline into the system, giving a temporary boost, but possibly causing fatigue and depression later. If you take more caffeine to counteract these effects, you end up spending the day in an agitated state, and might find yourself jumpy and edgy by night.
 
Cortisol: Caffeine can increase the body’s levels of cortisol, the “stress hormone”, which can lead to other health consequences ranging from weight gain and moodiness to heart disease and diabetes.
Dopamine– Caffeine increases dopamine levels in the system, acting in a way similar to amphetamines, which can make you feel good after taking it, but after it wears off you can feel ‘low’. This effect can also lead to a physical dependence because of dopamine manipulation.
Alcohol, Sugar, Salt and Nicotine:
 
You should aim to reduce your intake of alcohol, sugar and salt. Too much of these are never good. Consumption of these items are all known to strip the body of essential nutrients and undo the work of a healthier diet. Stop smoking! Although reaching for a cigarette may feel like instant stress relief it actually causes greater stress over time.
How to Lower Cortisol Levels With Diet (isn’t this wonderful?!?)

 

Stress and diet:
 
Stress and diet have always been linked. It is possible that someone eating a healthy, balanced diet is going to be far less stressed than someone eating a poor diet. If one is feeling overly stressed, the digestive system is probably under a great deal of strain, therefore making changes to your diet key to feeling better physically and emotionally. You can greatly help manage cortisones levels and regain your health by maintaining a suitable diet, exercise routine, sleep and stress levels. In absence of Cushing’s Disease, here are steps that help lower high cortisol levels naturally:
1. Switch to a Whole Foods, Anti-inflammatory Diet
Poorly managed blood sugar levels (especially hypoglycemia, having low blood sugar) and high levels of inflammation can contribute to high cortisol levels and other hormonal imbalances. Following an anti-inflammatory diet low in processed foods and high in antioxidants, fiber and essential nutrients is key to balancing hormones, controlling cravings and tackling stress. These same strategies can also help with adrenal support, allowing you to reach and maintain a healthy weight, boosting energy during the day and helping aid sleep.
Some of the most significant dietary contributors to inflammation and high cortisol levels include:
*High-sugar, high-glycemic diet (with many packaged foods, refined grain products, sugary drinks and snacks).
*Consuming high amounts of refined and trans fats
drinking too much caffeine and alcohol.
*Insufficient intake of micronutrients and antioxidants.
*Low fiber content of food (which makes it hard to balance blood sugar)
*Low consumption of unsaturated fats or unhealthy protein (which can lead to hunger, weight gain and high blood sugar).
Instead, switching to a low-glycemic diet, include healthy fats and proteins with every meal, and make sure to get enough fiber and phytonutrients by eating plenty fresh fruits and vegetables. Some of the most useful foods for lowering cortisol and stabilizing blood sugar include vegetables; fruits; coconut or olive oil; nuts; seeds; lean proteins like eggs, fish and grass-fed beef; and probiotic foods (like yogurt, kefir or cultured vegetables).
 
2. Use Adaptogen Herbs and Superfoods:
Adaptogen herbs help naturally lower high cortisol levels in several key ways. They help balance hormones; reduce inflammation due to their strong antioxidant, antiviral and antibacterial effects; they possess natural antidepressant effects; lower fatigue; and help balance blood pressure and blood sugar levels. Many adaptogens, such as mushrooms and cocoa, have been safely used for thousands of years to promote better overall health with little to no side effects.
There are at least various proven adaptogenic herbs that can help lower cortisol, including ginseng, garlic, basil and medicinal mushrooms among others.
3. On Stressful Days, Eat Little and Often (small frequent meals):
 
This will keep the metabolism ticking all day and minimise peaks and troughs in energy levels. Eat breakfast, though you may not feel hungry or believe you do not have enough time. Eating breakfast helps to kick start metabolism for the day and also helps to stabilise your blood sugar level which will in turn reduce stress. Choose fruit or fruit juice and a whole-grain cereal for maximum benefits.

 

4. Eat Well Throughout the Day
 
Be sure to eat at least five portions of fruit and vegetables each day and focus on foods containing Vitamins B and C, and Magnesium. B Vitamins can help you feel more energetic after a stressful episode. Bananas, leafy green vegetables, avocados, nuts, seeds and also meat, fish and dairy products all contain essential B vitamins.
Vitamin C: The adrenal glands contain the largest store of vitamin C in the body and are important in the production of stress hormones. Eat citrus fruit such as oranges, tomatoes, peppers, kiwi fruit, leafy green vegetables, broccoli and other foods rich in Vitamin C.
Magnesium: Magnesiumhelps to relax muscles and reduce anxiety. Increase your magnesium intake by eating nuts, especially Brazil nuts, but also hazelnuts and peanuts. Leafy green vegetables, whole grains, especially oats, brown rice and beans are also good sources of magnesium. Take a relaxing bath with a good handful of Epsom salts (available at pharmacists) as these contain magnesium that can be absorbed through your skin.
As well as trying to maximise your intake of certain foodstuffs, you should also be aware of the negative effects of others and therefore try to minimise them.




5. Opt For Green Tea:
stress and green tea
If you take a lot of coffee you may not realize the effects caffeine has on your system. However, you can reduce your stress levels and improve your mental performance throughout the day if you gradually wean yourself of large amounts of caffeine. A relatively easy and healthy way to do that is to replace coffee with decafinated green tea, which has a soothing taste and the added benefit of plenty antioxidants!

 

6. Try Sparkling Juice:
If you’re a cola drinker, you are probably experiencing the same health consequences from caffeine that coffee drinkers experience. A more healthful alternative is sparkling fruit juice, or sparkling water. You won’t only be getting a refreshing treat, but you’ll be adding water to your system, rather than detracting it (caffeine dehydrates, so drinking it is akin to un-drinking water!), and you’ll be avoiding other caffeine-related side effects.
How can a Dietitian help with stress and diet?

 

Seeing a registered health professional such as a nutritionist is essential if you want to make long-term positive changes to your diet in order to effectively manage stress. A nutritionist can provide tailored nutritional advice and support to ensure all your needs are catered for and specific goals are met. This will involve an assessment to pinpoint nutritional needs and what stress relieving foods will be the most suitable for you. As part of your assessment, your dietitian will look at triggers and contributing factors, as well as any underlying imbalances such as adrenal hormones and thyroid problems. Following this, you will be given a specific diet plan to follow, which will also outline lifestyle changes such as physical activity, which will play an important role in stress management for the long-term.
Dietetics is a subjective science and not a one size fits all so it is important to consult a professional who would treat you as “a person” as conditions applicable to others may not be applicable to your peculiar situation. Good luck.
Sources:
http://www.skillsyouneed.com/ps/stress-nutrition-diet.html#ixzz4WPpFBXh1
Stress System Malfunction Could Lead To Serious, Life-Threatening Disease. NIH Backgrounder September 9, 2002.
Teitelbaum, Jacob, M.D. How Stress Can Make You Gain Weight. Total Health Vol 25. no. 5. Oct/Nov 2003.
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Diet Therapy of Diseases

DIET MANAGEMENT OF ALZHEIMERS DISEASE

alzheimers disease
I recently accompanied my aunt to see an old relative who suffers from Alzheimers Disease. Her state was so pitiful and she had degenerated so much that my aunt teared up. A virtual shadow of herself and unrecognizable. This hit me real bad and I decided to do something on it. I hope you are well educated  by this.
Alzheimer’s Disease:
alzheimers disease
Like all types of dementia, Alzheimers is caused by brain cell death.3 It is a neurodegenerative disease, which means there is spontaneous brain cell death that happens over a course of time.
The total brain size shrinks with Alzheimers – the tissue has progressively fewer nerve cells and connections thereby reducing it’s efficiency. There are some predisposing factors such as age, lifestyle and diet (we’d get to that later).
A recent research study found that age related decline could start as early as 45, crazy isn’t it?. The good news is that a number of encouraging research avenues indicate that risk of dementia and Alzheimers could be reduced in the early stages by a comprehensive optimum nutrition approach, yes I highlighted that on purpose until you all learn that virtually every ailment can be linked to dietThe strongest evidence to date relates to raised homocysteine levels, which both predicts risk and can cause the kind of brain damage seen in Alzheimers, caused by lack of B vitamins, especially B12 which is progressively malabsorbed with age.Homocysteine is a neurotoxin, capable of directly damaging the medial temporal lobe, which is the area of the brain that rapidly degenerates in AD. Homocysteine is easily lowered with common B vitamins, gottn from veggies and fruits.
Other nutritional solutions which research suggest can affect cognitive decline or Alzheimer’s risk include omega 3s (DHA), antioxidants such as Vitamin E (due to the inflammatory nature of Alzheimer’s) and acetylcholine which is a key part of memory function (which is usually deficient in Alzheimer’s cases).
 
Role of Nutrients and PhytoNutrients:
 
Omega-3 fats:
alzheimers disease
Omega-3 fats are mostly found in carnivorous, cold water fish such as salmon, tuna, herring and mackerel. According to a study by Dr. Martha Morris and colleagues at Chicago’s Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, eating fish once a week reduces your risk of developing Alzheimer’s by as much as 60 per cent.
Antioxidants:
 
Inflammatory reactions basically mean increased production of oxidants, and hence an increased need for antioxidants like vitamin A, beta-carotene, and vitamins C and E, all of which have been shown to be low in those with Alzheimer’s. Other bioactive components, including cysteine, glutathione, lipoic acid, anthocyanidins, and co-enzyme Q10 and melatonin may also prove important. In simple terms this means eating a lot more fresh fruit and vegetables – at least six portions a day – and oily fish and seeds.
Stress, Cortisol and Memory Loss:
alzheimers and diet
Under prolonged stress, the body produces the adrenal hormone cortisol. The research of Professor Robert Sapolsky at Stanford University has shown that although cortisol is a powerful anti-inflammatory hormone, raised cortisol can damage the brain. In studies with rats he found that two weeks of induced stress causing raised cortisol levels causes dendrites, (connections between brain cells), to shrink. He believes that brain cell loss in ageing and Alzheimer’s may be, in part, due to high levels of cortisol and recommends that corticosteroid drugs should not be used in Alzheimer’s patients for other medical problems like asthma or arthritis.
 
Why Do Some Foods Induce Memory Loss?
The brain needs its own brand of fuel (exclusively carbohydrate sources of glucose). It requires healthy fats, fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, and adequate vitamins and minerals for optimal function. Consuming too little of these foods and too many complex carbohydrates, processed foods and sugar stimulates the production of toxins in the body. Those toxins can lead to inflammation, the build-up of plaques in the brain and, as a result, impaired cognitive function.
These effects apply to people of all ages, not just elders.
 
Foods That Induce Memory Loss:
alzheimers disease
 
Unfortunately, the foods that hamper memory are common staples in the modern diet. White breads, pasta, processed meats and cheeses, all of these have been linked to Alzheimers disease. Some experts have even found that whole grain breads are as bad as white breads because they spike blood sugar, which causes inflammation! (I know right! )
Here’s a list of foods linked to increased rates of Alzheimer’s disease:
*Processed cheeses, including American cheese, mozzarella sticks, Cheez Whiz and Laughing Cow. These foods build up proteins in the body that have been associated with Alzheimer’s.
*Processed meats, such as bacon, smoked turkey from the deli counter and ham. Smoked meats like these contain nitrosamines, which cause the liver to produce fats that are toxic to the brain.
 
Beer. Most beers contain nitrites, which have been linked to Alzheimers.
alzheimers disease
*White foods, including pasta, cakes, white sugar, white rice and white bread. Consuming these causes a spike in insulin production and sends toxins to the brain.
*Microwave popcorn contains diacetyl, a chemical that may increase amyloid plaques in the brain. Research has linked a buildup of amyloid plaques to Alzheimer’s disease.
Foods That Boost Memory:
 
Changing dietary habits is never easy. However, avoiding foods that induce memory loss and eating more of the foods that boost memory improves your chances of enjoying all-around health.
Here’s the list of foods that help boost memory:
alzheimers disease
*Leafy green vegetables
*Salmon and other cold-water fish
*Berries and dark-skinned fruits
*Coffee and chocolate
*Extra virgin olive oil
*Cold-pressed virgin coconut oil
Feeding Tips:
 
Now we know that Alzheimers disease patients require extra care, patience and attention. Providing a healthy diet regimen without getting it into them would be highly ineffective. Here are some ways to get through to Alzheimer’s disease patients.
Provide an adequate diet with a variety of foods.
Offer vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low-fat dairy products and lean protein foods.
Limit foods with high saturated fat and cholesterol.
Some fat is essential for health — but not all fats are healthy. Go light on fats that are bad for heart health, such as butter, solid shortening, lard and fatty cuts of meats.
 

Cut down on refined sugars:

Often found in processed foods, refined sugars contain calories but lack vitamins, minerals and fiber. You can tame a sweet tooth with healthier options like fruit or juice-sweetened baked goods. But note that in the later-stages of Alzheimer’s, if loss of appetite is a problem, adding sugar to food may encourage eating.
 

Limit foods with high sodium and minimize salt.

Most people consume more sodium than recommended, which affects blood pressure. Cut down by using spices or herbs to season food as an alternative.
As the disease progresses, loss of appetite (anorexia) and weight loss may become concerns. In such cases, the doctor may suggest supplements between meals to add calories.
Staying hydrated may be a problem as well. Encourage fluids by offering small cups of water or other liquids throughout the day or foods with high water content, such as fruit, soups, milkshakes and smoothies.
 

Possible Causes of Poor Appetite:

 
Understand that the patient is not conscious of their decisions and that you need to be tolerant of their actions.

Not recognizing food: The person may no longer recognize the foods you put on his or her plate.

Poor fitting dentures. Eating may be painful, but the person may not be able to tell you this. Make sure dentures fit and visit the dentist regularly.

Medications. New medications or a dosage change may affect appetite. If you notice a change, contact the physician.
Not enough exercise. Energy Lack of physical activity will decrease appetite. Encourage simple exercise, such as going for a walk, gardening or washing dishes.
Decreased sense of smell and taste. The person with dementia may not eat because food may not smell or taste as good as it once did.
Ways of Limiting distractions while Eating:
 
*Serve meals in quiet surroundings, away from the television and other distractions.
*Keep the table setting simple.
*Avoid placing items on the table — such as table arrangements or plastic fruit — that might distract or confuse the person. Use only the utensils needed for the meal.
*Distinguish food from the plate.
*Changes in visual and spatial abilities may make it tough for someone with dementia to distinguish food from the plate or the plate from the table. It can help to use white plates or bowls with a contrasting color placemat. Avoid patterned dishes, tablecloths and placemats.
*Check the food temperature. A person with dementia might not be able to tell if something is too hot to eat or drink. Always test the temperature of foods and beverages before serving.
*Serve only one or two foods at a time. Too many foods at once may be overwhelming. Simplify by serving one dish at a time. For example, mashed potatoes followed by meat.
*Be flexible to food preferences. Keep long-standing personal preferences in mind when preparing food, and be aware that a person with dementia may suddenly develop new food preferences or reject foods that were liked in the past.
*Give the person plenty of time to eat. Remind him or her to chew and swallow carefully. Keep in mind that it may take an hour or longer to finish eating.
*Eat together. Make meals an enjoyable social event so everyone looks forward to the experience. Research suggests that people eat better when they are in the company of others.
Keep in mind the person may not remember when or if he or she ate.
*If the person continues to ask about eating breakfast, consider serving several breakfasts — juice, followed by toast, followed by cereal.

Sources:

http://www.alzheimers.net/2014-01-02/foods-that-induce-memory-loss/
M. Morris, et al.. Consumption of fish and n-3 fatty acids and risk of incident Alzheimer disease. Arch Neurol, vol 60, pp. 940-946 (2003)
S. Seshadri et al. Plasma homocysteine as a risk factor for dementia and AD. N Engl J Med, vol 346(7), pp. 476-483. (2002)
P. S. Sachdev et al.. Relationship between plasma homocysteine levels and brain atrophy in healthy elderly individuals. Neurology vol 58, pp. 1539-1541 (2002)
S. J. Duthie, et al.. Homocysteine, B vitamin status, and cognitive function in the elderly. Am J Clin Nutr, vol  75(5), pp. 908-913 (2002)
https://www.alz.org/care/alzheimers-food-eating.asp
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Men’s Health

WORKING OUT FOR THE BEDROOM 2

Even More Tips for Better Sex

If pushups, crunches, and deadlifts aren’t your idea of a sweaty good time, you’ve still got plenty of exercise options to help keep things steamy.

Pick your pleasure: Sexual Dysfunction

Rather walk, swim, or jog? How about Pilates or yoga? Maybe you prefer biking or skiing? Great, because Paul Frediani, fitness coach and co-author of Sex Flex: The Way to Enhanced Intimacy and Pleasure , says “barring any health problems, cardiovascular exercise of any kind is a great way to stimulate your sex life”. Now trust me, enjoying the stuff you do helps relieves you of the stress of the activity, makes you look forward to it and enhances it’s benefits.
But you’ll want to avoid the weekend warrior syndrome to get the most out of exercising. Th.s means you have to exercise more than just on weekends to reap full benefits. Aim for a 30-minute workout five times a week. Get your blood pumping regularly and the payoff is simple: endurance, more strength to hold positions, and the flexibility to hold them comfortably. Now that’s sexy. *wink*

Bonus: Better Erections!
Wowza!

You may already be sold on the benefits of exercise, but here’s a bonus free of charge. Exercise may also help beat erectile dysfunction. One study showed that, for men over 50, being physically active means a 30% lower risk of erectile dysfunction as compared to men who are sedentary. Studies also show a strong link between obesity and erectile dysfuncton.
In addition, people who exercise often have a better body image than people who don’t. This can help them feel more sexually appealingnt and confide. One study found that “80% of men and 60% of females who exercised two to three times a week felt their sexual desirability was above average,” Weil says. Exercise could also help produce more muscles, which in turn increases testosterone production and sex drive.

Practice! Practice!! Practice!!!

If you’re not lasting as long as you’d like in bed, you might need some practice. While sex is the best way to practice for sex, masturbation can also help you improve your longevity.
However, how you masturbate could have detrimental effects. If you rush through it, you could inadvertently decrease the time you last with your partner. The secret is making it last, just like you want to when you’re not alone.

Dietary Management of Sexual Dysfunction

Erectile Dysfunction

Certain foods can also help increase blood flow towards those parts you want them most. They include:

Onions and garlic: These foods may not be great for your breath, but they can help your blood circulation.

 

 

Bananas: This potassium-rich fruit can help lower your blood pressure, which can benefit your important sexual parts and boost sexual performance.Erectile Dysfunction

 

 

Chilies and peppers: All-natural spicy foods help your blood flow by reducing hypertension and inflammation.

Nutrients that can help you achieve better blood flow:

Omega-3 acids: This type of fat increases blood flow. You can find it in salmon, tuna, avocados, and olive oil.

Vitamin B-1: This vitamin helps signals in your nervous system move quicker, including signals from your brain to your penis. It’s found in pork, peanuts, and kidney beans.

Eggs: 

High in other B vitamins, eggs help balance hormone levels. This can decrease stress that often inhibits an erection.

Sources:

http://www.healthline.com/health-slideshow/male-sexual-performance.Accessed 27th July, 2016.

http://www.askmen.com/dating/love_tip_250/287b_love_tip.html

http://www.webmd.com/men/features/exercises-better-sex. Accessed 27th July, 2016.

Hamilton, L.D., Rellini, A.H., & Meston, C.M. “Cortisol, sexual arousal, and affect in response to sexual stimuli” Journal of Sexual Medicine 5 (2008): 2111-18.Accessed 27th July, 2016.

Ojanlatva, A., et al. “Sexual activity and perceived health among FinnisAccessed 27th July, 2016.h middle-aged women.” Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 4 (2006).Accessed 27th July, 2016.

McNamara, E., Alfred-Thomas, J., & Freedland, S.J., “Exercise Correlates to Higher Sexual Function Scores in a Cohort of Healthy Men” (paper presented at the 105 Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association, 31 May 2010).Accessed 27th July, 2016.

His and Her Heath. ” Smoking, Lack of Exercise Impacts Sexual and Urinary Function .” Accessed 27th July, 2016.

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LifeStyle

UNUSUAL BENEFITS OF FOODS

DID YOU KNOW YOU COULD TREAT EVEN THE BAREST AILMENTS OF LIFE WITH FOOD?.. THERE ARE A MILLION HOME REMEDIES TO VARIOUS ISSUES SUCH AS:

1.) INSOMNIA (LACK OF SLEEP):

THERE ARE NUTRIENTS IN FOOD WHICH NOT ONLY RELAX YOU BUT INCREASE THE QUANTITY OF MELATONIN (SLEEP HORMONE) IN THE BODY, RELIEVING YOU AND PLACING YOUR MIND IN A STATE OF AMBROSIA. PURELY DIETARY AND DEVOID OF CHEMICALS. IN THE RIGHT MIX AND PROPORTION, FOODS CAN PROVIDE THIS EFECT.

2.) INFERTILITY:

FOR BOTH THE MALE AND FEMALE, SOME DIETS IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF SPERM AND EGGS, MAKING CONCEPTION EASIER AND MORE FEASIBLE.

3.) HAIR QUALITY:

RECENTLY I JUST DISCOVERED A PLANT IN THE NORTH WHOSE LEAVES WOULD GUARANTEE YOU NOT ONLY A LONG HAIR, BUT RICH, FULL AND BLACK AS WELL. NOW, THERE IS A RECIPE TO THIS, AS IT IS TO BE COMBINED WITH VARIOUS OTHER COMPONENTS TO PROVIDE DESIRED EFFECT. WE COULD MAKE AND PACKAGE THIS FOR YOU, WITH INSTRUCTIOS FOR USE. WITH MONEY BACK GUARANTEE OF COURSE.

4.) SENSUAL FOODS:

WE COULD PROVIDE YOU WITH EITHER A RECIPE, OR MAKE YOU THE DIET ITSELF (ON REQUEST OF COURSE) THAT WOULD NOT ONLY KEEP YOU AND YOUR PARTNER VIRILE, BUT ALSO INCREASE THE LEVELS OF OESTROGEN AMD TESTOSTERONE, KEEPING YOU BOTH ON EACH OTHERS NECKS. JUST ASK!

5.) DEPRESSION:

THIS CAN BE CAUSED BY STRESS, WORRY AND OTHER FACTORS. AT GOLDEN LIVING, WE WOULD NOT ONLY STOP AT PRESCRIPTION BUT ALSO WE COULD MAKE A DELICATE MIX FOR U, WITH DELIVERY TO YOUR DOORSTEP, THAT WOULD KEEP YOU SMILING.

6.) MENSTRUAL ISSUES:

FROM AMENORRHEA, PAINFUL MENSES, E.T.C.. WE PROVIDE CONSULTATIONS AND EVEN DELIVER THERAPEUTIC MIXES ANYWHERE NATIONWIDE  TO TAKE CARE OF YOUR MENSTRUAL WORRIES. DONT BE DECIEVED, PAINFUL MENSTRUATION IS CURABLE. SEE FOR YOURSELF.

FOR ALL THESE AND MORE, WE COULD PREPARE A MIX FOR YOU, PURELY OUT OF FOOD.. WITH THE RIGHT NUTRIENTZ AND BIO-ACTIVE COMPONENTS TARGETTED AT SOLVING YOUR PROBLEMS. RESULTS WOULD DEFINITELY BE EVIDENT WITHIN A TWO WEEK TO 1 MONTH PERIOD. ALL THESE AT A SMALL PRICE, ONE BARELY SUITING THE EFFECT YOU WOULD DERIVE. FOR THE RECIPES, CONTACT US AS WELL, AND FOR AN EVEN SMALLER PRICE WE WOULD TEACH YOU HOW TO MAKE THESE THERAPEUTIC MIXES YOURSELF.

WE WISH TO SEE YOU LIVE HAPPY, HEALTHY AND LONG. THANK YOU.

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