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KETOGENIC DIET: AN ASTONISHING WAY TO LOOSE WEIGHT

A client of mine asked for details of a ketogenic diet. Personally I don’t subscribe to the idea of taking lots of fat while trying to lose fat supposedly. I figured it portends more harm than good for the patient; especially in Nigeria where unsaturated fats sources (which are most ideal for a ketogenic diet) are not really available and expensive when found. So I decided to get comprehensive components, advantages and disadvantages of the diet, so let us talk about it shall we? This is quite comprehensive so kindly forgive it’s lengthy nature.

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DIET MANAGEMENT OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

I recently accompanied my aunt to see an old relative who suffers from Alzheimer’s Disease. Her state was so pitiful and she had degenerated so much that my aunt teared up. A virtual shadow of herself and unrecognizable. This hit me real bad and I decided to do something on it. I hope you are well educated  by this.
Alzheimer’s Disease:
Like all types of dementia, Alzheimer’s is caused by brain cell death.3 It is a neurodegenerative disease, which means there is spontaneous brain cell death that happens over a course of time.
The total brain size shrinks with Alzheimer’s – the tissue has progressively fewer nerve cells and connections thereby reducing it’s efficiency. There are some predisposing factors such as age, lifestyle and diet (we’d get to that later).
A recent research study found that age related decline could start as early as 45! Crazy isn’t it?. The good news is that a number of encouraging research avenues indicate that risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s could be reduced in the early stages by a comprehensive optimum nutrition approach, yes I highlighted that on purpose until you all learn that virtually every ailment can be linked to dietThe strongest evidence to date relates to raised homocysteine levels, which both predicts risk and can cause the kind of brain damage seen in Alzheimer’s, caused by lack of B vitamins, especially B12 which is progressively malabsorbed with age.Homocysteine is a neurotoxin, capable of directly damaging the medial temporal lobe, which is the area of the brain that rapidly degenerates in AD. Homocysteine is easily lowered with common B vitamins, gottn from veggies and fruits.
Other nutritional solutions which research suggest can affect cognitive decline or Alzheimer’s risk include omega 3s (DHA), antioxidants such as Vitamin E (due to the inflammatory nature of Alzheimer’s) and acetylcholine which is a key part of memory function (which is usually deficient in Alzheimer’s cases).

Role of Nutrients and PhytoNutrients:

Omega-3 fats:

Omega-3 fats are mostly found in carnivorous, cold water fish such as salmon, tuna, herring and mackerel. According to a study by Dr Martha Morris and colleagues at Chicago’s Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, eating fish once a week reduces your risk of developing Alzheimer’s by as much as 60 per cent.
Antioxidants:

Inflammatory reactions basically mean increased production of oxidants, and hence an increased need for antioxidants like vitamin A, beta-carotene, and vitamins C and E, all of which have been shown to be low in those with Alzheimer’s. Other bioactive components, including cysteine, glutathione, lipoic acid, anthocyanidins, and co-enzyme Q10 and melatonin may also prove important. In simple terms this means eating a lot more fresh fruit and vegetables – at least six portions a day – and oily fish and seeds.
Stress, Cortisol and Memory Loss:

Under prolonged stress, the body produces the adrenal hormone cortisol. The research of Professor Robert Sapolsky at Stanford University has shown that although cortisol is a powerful anti-inflammatory hormone, raised cortisol can damage the brain. In studies with rats he found that two weeks of induced stress causing raised cortisol levels causes dendrites, (connections between brain cells), to shrink. He believes that brain cell loss in ageing and Alzheimer’s may be, in part, due to high levels of cortisol and recommends that corticosteroid drugs should not be used in Alzheimer’s patients for other medical problems like asthma or arthritis.

Why Do Some Foods Induce Memory Loss?

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The brain needs its own brand of fuel (exclusively carbohydrate sources of glucose). It requires healthy fats, fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, and adequate vitamins and minerals for optimal function. Consuming too little of these foods and too many complex carbohydrates, processed foods and sugar stimulates the production of toxins in the body. Those toxins can lead to inflammation, the build-up of plaques in the brain and, as a result, impaired cognitive function.
These effects apply to people of all ages, not just elders.

Foods That Induce Memory Loss:

Unfortunately, the foods that hamper memory are common staples in the modern diet. White breads, pasta, processed meats and cheeses, all of these have been linked to Alzheimer’s disease. Some experts have even found that whole grain breads are as bad as white breads because they spike blood sugar, which causes inflammation! (I know right! )
Here’s a list of foods linked to increased rates of Alzheimer’s disease:
*Processed cheeses, including American cheese, mozzarella sticks, Cheez Whiz and Laughing Cow. These foods build up proteins in the body that have been associated with Alzheimer’s.
*Processed meats, such as bacon, smoked turkey from the deli counter and ham. Smoked meats like these contain nitrosamines, which cause the liver to produce fats that are toxic to the brain.

Beer. Most beers contain nitrites, which have been linked to Alzheimer’s.
*White foods, including pasta, cakes, white sugar, white rice and white bread. Consuming these causes a spike in insulin production and sends toxins to the brain.
*Microwave popcorn contains diacetyl, a chemical that may increase amyloid plaques in the brain. Research has linked a buildup of amyloid plaques to Alzheimer’s disease.
Foods That Boost Memory:

Changing dietary habits is never easy. However, avoiding foods that induce memory loss and eating more of the foods that boost memory improves your chances of enjoying all-around health.
Here’s the list of foods that help boost memory:
*Leafy green vegetables
*Salmon and other cold-water fish
*Berries and dark-skinned fruits
*Coffee and chocolate
*Extra virgin olive oil
*Cold-pressed virgin coconut oil
Feeding Tips:

Now we know that Alzheimer’s disease patients require extra care, patience and attention. Providing a healthy diet regimen without getting it into them would be highly ineffective. Here are some ways to get through to Alzheimer’s disease patients.
Provide an adequate diet with a variety of foods.
Offer vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low-fat dairy products and lean protein foods.
Limit foods with high saturated fat and cholesterol.
Some fat is essential for health — but not all fats are healthyl. Go light on fats that are bad for heart health, such as butter, solid shortening, lard and fatty cuts of meats.

Cut down on refined sugars.
Often found in processed foods, refined sugars contain calories but lack vitamins, minerals and fiber. You can tame a sweet tooth with healthier options like fruit or juice-sweetened baked goods. But note that in the later-stages of Alzheimer’s, if loss of appetite is a problem, adding sugar to food may encourage eating.

Limit foods with high sodium and minimize salt.
Most people consume more sodium than recommended, which affects blood pressure. Cut down by using spices or herbs to season food as an alternative.
As the disease progresses, loss of appetite (anorexia) and weight loss may become concerns. In such cases, the doctor may suggest supplements between meals to add calories.
Staying hydrated may be a problem as well. Encourage fluids by offering small cups of water or other liquids throughout the day or foods with high water content, such as fruit, soups, milkshakes and smoothies.

Possible Causes of Poor Appetite:

Understand that the patient is not conscious of their decisions and that you need to be tolerant of their actions.

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Not recognizing food. The person may no longer recognize the foods you put on his or her plate.
Poor fitting dentures. Eating may be painful, but the person may not be able to tell you this. Make sure dentures fit and visit the dentist regularly.
Medications. New medications or a dosage change may affect appetite. If you notice a change, contact the physician.
Not enough exercise. Lack of physical activity will decrease appetite. Encourage simple exercise, such as going for a walk, gardening or washing dishes.
Decreased sense of smell and taste. The person with dementia may not eat because food may not smell or taste as good as it once did.
Limit distractions:

*Serve meals in quiet surroundings, away from the television and other distractions.
*Keep the table setting simple.
*Avoid placing items on the table — such as table arrangements or plastic fruit — that might distract or confuse the person. Use only the utensils needed for the meal.
*Distinguish food from the plate.
*Changes in visual and spatial abilities may make it tough for someone with dementia to distinguish food from the plate or the plate from the table. It can help to use white plates or bowls with a contrasting color placemat. Avoid patterned dishes, tablecloths and placemats.
*Check the food temperature. A person with dementia might not be able to tell if something is too hot to eat or drink. Always test the temperature of foods and beverages before serving.
*Serve only one or two foods at a time. Too many foods at once may be overwhelming. Simplify by serving one dish at a time. For example, mashed potatoes followed by meat.
*Be flexible to food preferences. Keep long-standing personal preferences in mind when preparing food, and be aware that a person with dementia may suddenly develop new food preferences or reject foods that were liked in the past.
*Give the person plenty of time to eat. Remind him or her to chew and swallow carefully. Keep in mind that it may take an hour or longer to finish eating.
*Eat together. Make meals an enjoyable social event so everyone looks forward to the experience. Research suggests that people eat better when they are in the company of others.
Keep in mind the person may not remember when or if he or she ate.
*If the person continues to ask about eating breakfast, consider serving several breakfasts — juice, followed by toast, followed by cereal.
Sources:
http://www.alzheimers.net/2014-01-02/foods-that-induce-memory-loss/
M. Morris, et al.. Consumption of fish and n-3 fatty acids and risk of incident Alzheimer disease. Arch Neurol, vol 60, pp. 940-946 (2003)
S. Seshadri et al. Plasma homocysteine as a risk factor for dementia and AD. N Engl J Med, vol 346(7), pp. 476-483. (2002)
P. S. Sachdev et al.. Relationship between plasma homocysteine levels and brain atrophy in healthy elderly individuals. Neurology vol 58, pp. 1539-1541 (2002)
S. J. Duthie, et al.. Homocysteine, B vitamin status, and cognitive function in the elderly. Am J Clin Nutr, vol  75(5), pp. 908-913 (2002)
https://www.alz.org/care/alzheimers-food-eating.asp
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HOW TO DEAL WITH MENOPAUSE

Okay, some years back I noticed my mum got irritable. I mean a real monster to live with. I thought she got tired of living with us. Then it clicked. She was going through the great change and instantly I felt pity for her. Just recently a friend complained of same from an aunt and bearing on the general conception that every ailment of man hinges on diet and can be helped by the same.
What is Menopause :
Menopause is basically when a woman stops having periods and is no longer able to get pregnant naturally.
Periods usually start to become less frequent over a few months or years before they stop altogether. Sometimes they can stop suddenly. Menopause is a natural part of ageing that usually occurs between 45 and 55 years of age, as a woman’s oestrogen levels decline.
However, around 1 in 100 women experience the menopause before 40 years of age. This is known as premature menopause or premature ovarian insufficiency.
Symptoms of Menopause:

Most women will experience menopausal symptoms. Some of these can be quite severe and have a significant impact on your everyday activities (makes sense now!).
Common symptoms include:
*Hot flushes
*Night sweats
*Vaginal dryness and discomfort during sex
*Difficulty sleeping
*Depression or anxiety
*Low libido
*short term memory and concentration
Menopausal symptoms can begin months or even years before your periods stop and last around four years after your last period, although some women experience them for much longer.
Dietary Approaches to Managing Menopause:
Sugar Consumption:

Hormonal fluctuations can affect the body’s ability to maintain stable blood sugar levels, so reducing sugar intake is a major component to weight loss and maintenance. But an all-or-nothing approach is not the way to go when it comes to the sweet stuff, says Gibbs. While the women in her study who reduced their sugar intake lost the most weight, and had maintained that loss 4 years after the study began, she’s quick to say that these women reduced their sugar intake—they didn’t eliminate it altogether, which is a tough habit to keep up with (and can lead to binges). Refined sugars, like those in cookies and cakes, are the ones you should reduce. Keep the natural sugars that are found in fruit as your main source of sweetness.

Fat Free Foods:
Fat-free or reduced-fat foods are bad news for post menopausal women for a few reasons.
1.) They keep you from eating the healthy fats your body needs to combat heart disease, which postmenopausal women may be at increased risk of due to a combination of reduced estrogen, poor diet, and lack of exercise.
2.) With many fat-free foods, including salad dressings and peanut butter, you’re gaining in sugar what you’re losing in fat, which is not good for weight control, energy, and overall health. Stacy Kennedy, MPH, RD, a Boston-based nutritionist who works with postmenopausal women on weight management issues, advises sticking with minimally processed, plant-based sources of fat that are rich in vitamin E, antioxidants, and omega-3s, such as nuts, fish, and avocados. These fats are even correlated with colon cancer prevention; some studies have shown an increased risk of this type of cancer among postmenopausal women who do not use hormone replacement therapy.

Calcium Supplementation :

It’s often advisable to get your nutrients (calcium inclusive) from natural foods e.g diary and diary products. Supplements are to be reserved for increased requirement cases such as osteoporosis and other bone issues and may not be necessary for a woman on a healthy diet. Excessive calcium intake carries health risks including kidney stones, constipation, and probably heart disease. Women are wise to protect their bones with a calcium-rich diet including foods like dark green leafy vegetables and dairy (even nondairy milks like almond or coconut milks are fortified with calcium). Another way to protect yourself is with resistance-based exercises that put bones under healthy stress to maintain their strength.
Red Wine:

How much wine is in a “glass” of wine? Many people “forget” that the actual serving size is a half-cup in a liquid measure. This means that many of us inadvertently exceed the recommendation of no more than one glass of an alcoholic beverage per day to reduce stroke risk and lower breast cancer risk, both issues of high concern for postmenopausal women. “Red wine in moderation isn’t necessarily bad for you, but it’s not the health food many women think it is,” says Kennedy. And for the record, the serving size for beer is 355 ml, and for hard liquor or spirits, the serving size is 44 mls.
Limit Fat Intake:
As age advances, there’s an increase in risk of certain diseases such as heart problems and diabetes usually due to hormone imbalances. The plan is not to cut fat totally out but to limit intake to healthy unsaturated sources. Fat should provide 25% to 35% or less of your total daily calories. Also, limit saturated fat to less than 7% of your total daily calories. Saturated fat raises cholesterol and boosts your risk for heart disease. It’s found in fatty meats, whole milk, ice cream, and cheese. Limit cholesterol to 300 milligrams or less per day. And watch out for trans fats, found in vegetable oils, many baked goods, and some margarine. Trans fat also raises cholesterol and increases your risk for heart disease.
Viewing Soy as a Miracle Food:

Soy is often touted a postmenopause wonder; it’s a plant-based source of protein and fiber that contains compounds that mimic the effects of estrogen in your body. In its whole-food forms, like edamame, tofu, or miso, soy does deliver on these healthful promises. But seeing “soy” or “soy protein” on a food label doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a healthy food. Protein powders or other highly processed soy products are far more concentrated than natural soy, and they can be risky for women with thyroid issues or a history of breast cancer because their hormone-like properties can raise the risks of estrogen-based cancers. (Stick with these protein powders for your smoothies). Although by acting in a similar way to oestrogen, they may help in keeping hormones a little more in balance. A high intake of phytoestrogens is thought to explain why hot flushes and other menopausal symptoms rarely occur in populations consuming a predominantly plant-based diet.It just should not be over done.
Pump up Your Iron:
Eat at least three servings of iron-rich foods a day. Iron is found in lean red meat, poultry, fish, eggs, leafy green vegetables, nuts, and enriched grain products. The recommended dietary allowance for iron in older women is 8 milligrams a day.

Get enough fiber:Help yourself to foods high in fiber, such as whole-grain breads, cereals, pasta, rice, fresh fruits, and vegetables. Most adult women should get about 21 grams of fiber a day. This helps to keep your gut healthy and eases bowel movement.
Associated Care Plans:
Eating your Feelings:
The transition into menopause can be emotionally intense, and many women fall into the habit of eating to self-soothe during that tumultuous time. Those habits can remain in place postmenopause, leading to weight gain, low energy, and unmanaged emotions. The first thing to do is recognize that what you are passing through is totally normal and try to replace food with healthier, mind stimulating habits. Exercising, talking to friends, volunteering in your community, practicing mindfulness meditation or yoga, and working with a therapist are all great strategies for emotional wellness.
Dry skin
Legumes, nuts and seeds such as pumpkin, sunflower, almonds contain vitamin E, zinc and calcium. These nutrients and the oils in nuts and seeds may help prevent dry skin and normalise hormone levels.
Depression and irritability:
Ensure you eat enough protein foods which contain the amino acid tryptophan. You can find it in turkey, cottage cheese, oats and legumes. Tryptophan helps manufacture the neurotransmitter serotonin. Serotonin helps moods and may help control sleep and appetite which can make you feel better in yourself. Other useful strategies to help you feel less irritable are to eat breakfast and not miss meals to balance your blood sugar.
Hot flushes
Avoid foods that are likely to trigger or worsen hot flushes and night sweats. For instance, avoid stimulants such as coffee, alcohol and chocolate and spicy foods, especially at night – they’re notorious for setting off hot flushes. A high intake of tryptophan containing foods could also help in abating hot flushes.
Tiredness:
Avoid snacking on sugary foods – all too often a sharp rise in your blood glucose level may be followed by a sharp dip which leaves you feeling tired and drained. Choose fresh fruit with a few nuts instead.
Finally, I may never have a personal experience on this subject but motivation and conscious decision to avoid triggers and fall outs of menopause would definitely help a great deal. Embrace the natural process you are going through and determine to make the best of it. Eat healthy, lots of exercise and water and stimulate your mind and you would find little or no consequence in menopause. Goodluck!
Sources :
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Health Benefits Of Snails

Our crawly neighbour’s are more than just slimy reservoirs of protein. They make a great substitute for regular red meat. Here are some recently discovered reasons to gobble them up!:
1.) Recent studies have found that an average snail contains a glycoprotein which is believed to have cancer fighting properties.
2.) The mucous exuded by these creatures contain a copper compund which helps in healing after an injury or scalding and also helps in preventing heart disorders.
3.) An average snail is comprised of 80% water, 15% proteins and 2.4% fat (unsaturated fats).

 4.) It contains essential fatty acids, calcium (well that’s mostly in d shell), magnesium and phosphorus.
 5.) They are highly and incredibly packed with vitamins E, K, A and B12.
6.) Snails are an ideal weight watchers diet because they are good sources of proteins but low in calories and fat. For a 100 gram serving of snail, u get about 90 kcals only!. In addition to these health benefits, snails are tasty, juicy, delicious and cheaper than any red meat and can be prepared in a variety of forms including boiling, drying, cooking and used in a variety of soups and with vegetables.

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