close

Protein

Uncategorized

HEALTH BENEFITS OF CASEIN PROTEIN

What is Casein Protein?

Derived from milk, like whey protein, casein is a naturally more abundant source of branched-chain amino acids . I guess that’s why it’s sometimes simply called “milk protein,” since around 80 percent of the protein found in cow’s milk is casein — and it also makes up 20 to 40% of human breast milk. It’s also abundant in raw sheep cheese, a pure source of casein.
Casein, like whey and other protein foods , is made up of various “building blocks” called essential and non-essential amino acids. The human body is able to make certain amino acids on its own (called non-essential) while others it cannot (called essential), making the essential kinds crucial to get through the foods you eat. Since plant foods don’t always provide the complete set of essential amino acids we need, animal foods — and sometimes convenient protein powders — are one way people make sure they cover their protein bases.
Casein protein powder is created in a lab from dehydrating parts of milk — the problem is that many forms are denatured and isolated, and may cause health issues. It is advisable to find casein protein that is from A2 beta-casein rather than A1 casein (see “Different Types of Casein Protein” below). You can usually find it in most good fitness and might come across a variety of flavors. What you’ll probably notice is that for every brand of casein protein powder available, about five different whey protein powders are also sold.

So what are the benefits of casein-protein?

LONGER LASTING:

Not all proteins are created equal. Whether it’s soy, egg, whey, animal, or casein protein, they all have their own unique advantages. Arguably, casein’s greatest strength is timing. Casein has the ability to provide your bloodstream with a slow and steady flow of amino acids that could last for hours. Muscles may not be built overnight, but drinking a glass of casein-rich milk is the ideal protein to consume right before bed, as it’ll be more helpful throughout the night than any other protein option.

GREATER GAINS
Want to build massive muscles quicker?
According to a Texas study , casein may be an important ingredient to this. Researchers took 36 males performing
heavy resistance training and found that the group consuming a whey and casein combination significantly outperformed participants who were given a combination of whey, BCAAs, and glutamine supplement. Over the course of the 10-week study, the whey and casein combination yielded the greatest increases in lean, fat-free mass. Why take only one form of protein when a combination yields much better results?

FAT LOSS:

Want to improve chances of muscle growth and fat loss? If so, you might be interested to know that a study conducted in the Netherlands found that by multiplying casein intake by two and a half times, participants were able to have a higher metabolic rate while sleeping and a better overall fat balance. Also of note is that satiety levels were 33% higher. In other words, by taking casein you’ll not only be increasing fat loss , but you’ll do so on a fuller stomach.

GREATER STRENGTH:

Ask any guy what his workout goals are and increased strength is almost always on the wish list. Often, to help get there quicker, people supplement using whey protein. In a Massachusetts study , researchers found that casein actually doubled the effect that whey protein had on legs, chest, and shoulder strength results. Researchers believe the reason for the significant difference was because of casein’s well-known anti-catabolic abilities. The next time you’re thinking of having a late-night snack, make it a casein shake.

DENTAL PROTECTION:

What makes you cringe more: The thought of the dental chair or the accompanying invoice? According to a study conducted in the United Kingdom, one way to help prevent a more expensive dental visit might be to consume casein. Their research found that casein proteins have the potential to reduce or prevent the effects of enamel erosion. So if you drink a lot of fruit juices, sweeteners or sugary substances, or just can’t kick the soft drink habit, at least consider protecting your teeth by adding some casein protein to your diet.

FOODS HIGH IN CASEIN:

While you can get casein from casein supplements you can also get a substantial amount from food sources. Casein is highest in dairy products like milk, cheese, cream, and yogurt and generally diary derivatives. Casein is also found in some fish like tuna, although in much smaller quantities than dairy products.

CASEIN CONTENT IN MILK:

Milk is one of the highest sources of casein available as roughly 80% of milk proteins are casein. So if you drink an 800mls glass of milk that has roughly 12 grams of protein, you get about 9.6 grams of casein based proteins. That is quite a lot!

WHAT ARE CASEIN HYDROLYSATE AND MICELLAR CASEIN?

MICELLAR CASEIN:

Micellar casein is the least adulterated form of supplemental casein. It is left in its “intact” molecular structure. This is important as it then is digested in a series of enzymatic and nonenzymatic processes in the body to encourage slow breakdown and absorption by the body.

HYDROLYZED CASEIN:

Hydrolyzed casein is simply micellar casein that has been broken down into smaller peptides by “hydrolyzing” the bonds. This process occurs just like it does in whey where it can be broken down using enzymes or acids. If you decide to go with hydrolyzed casein for some of the reasons we mention below, definitely go with the hydrolyzed as the acid makes it incredibly bitter.
Typically, hydrolyzed casein will be substantially more expensive than micellar casein due to the processing and extra steps in manufacturing. There doesn’t appear to be any magical properties of hydrolyzed casein over hydrolyzed whey. The magic of casein lies in the micellar form so speaking honestly, if you want something hydrolyzed go with a hydrolyzed whey.

Casein AND Whey

Although it might not fly off shelves quite as quickly as whey, casein protein is actually very similar to whey in more ways than one. Like whey, casein protein comes from dairy and is actually the primary protein found in cow’s milk. Unlike whey protein, however, it digests slower due to a complex interaction with stomach acids. This results in a slower release of essential proteins and amino acids, which makes casein the preferred supplement in situations when a slow release of nutrients is beneficial (like before bed when you’re going 7-10 hours without food).
This same benefit is also thought to make casein protein a less optimal supplement post-workout (when you want nutrients quickly). However, research indicates this might not be as big of a deal as we thought. In many cases, whey and casein can be interchangeable , St. Pierre says. “Honestly, it’s pretty much an equal substitute. The research that compares whey to caseins post-workout is equivocal,” he says. You can stock up on both. But, according to St. Pierre, “Your total protein intake far outweighs anything else.” While that total amount will vary from person to person, the experts at Precision Nutrition recommend taking in 0.6-0.9 grams per pound of bodyweight depending on activity levels (more active individuals need more protein).

Casein Protein vs. Whey Protein

For athletes, or really anyone who’s pretty active, protein is an important piece of the puzzle when it comes to muscle recovery, repairment and growth. While most people living in developed nations are far from suffering a protein deficiency, keep in mind that protein requirements increase the more active you become, and they’re especially high when you regularly lift weights or do other types of lengthy training.

While you might think that protein powders are only for serious lifters, bulky men or pro athletes, nearly everyone can benefit from supplementing workouts with the right mix of nutrients — and protein powders simply make this easier to do.
Whey protein and casein protein also differ in terms of their bioavailability and effects on muscle synthesis. Although whey protein has many of the same benefits, it’s believed to cause more of a fast “amino acid spike” compared to casein. When the body is flooded with more protein that it can use at one time, it’s possible for some to be flushed out through urine, oxidized or generally wasted.

However, this isn’t always a bad thing — different types of proteins have their upsides — so don’t go writing off whey protein just yet. There are certainly benefits to consuming both faster- and slower-releasing proteins; it really just comes down to your goals and schedule.

At the molecular level, within a protein source like casein various amino acids are branched together. Casein protein has a lower percentage of branched-chain amino acid compared to whey protein, which is one reason it’s slower to digest and also tends to work for longer. Because of its utilization and timing, casein increases protein synthesis a bit less than whey does.

On the plus side, it better stops the body from breaking down amino acids it already has available within your muscles. Whey protein also has more sulfur than casein, which can also change the way the body uses it. Compared to casein, whey is a fast protein source, which means it provides amino acids quickly after ingestion — however they also leave the body sooner than when you consume casein.

In theory, the two should work differently to affect body composition, however not every study has shown this to be true. For example, researchers from the Metabolism Unit at the University of Texas Medical Branch found that short-term ingestion of both whey and casein after exercise resulted in similar increases in muscle protein net balance. They didn’t actually result in differences in muscle protein synthesis despite different patterns of blood amino acid responses.

If all of this chemistry seems a bit confusing, here’s the bottom line on casein vs. whey. Both casein and whey protein can supplement your workouts well and include all the essential amino acids you need, but whey has more branched-chain amino acids and, therefore, might be slightly better at facilitating muscle protein synthesis.

The good news is this: After comparing the effects of both proteins on body composition and performance in female athletes, researchers from the Exercise and Performance Nutrition Laboratory at the University of South Florida found that whey and casein had similar positive effects. Females were found to experience benefits using both supplements, including an increase in performance markers from consuming protein after resistance training and a decreased body fat composition.

SOURCES:

https://www.muscleandstrength.com/expert-guides/casein-protein

http://dailyburn.com/life/health/best-protein-powder-whey-casein-vegan/

http://www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/supplements/5-benefits-of-casein-protein

read more
Uncategorized

HEALTH BENEFITS OF WHEY PROTEIN

While at the gym last Friday I encountered a young man who had heard plenty about the effect of whey proteins in muscle building. He asked me to affirm and I told him the much I could. It struck me then that plenty people don’t know much about whey and it’s health benefits. Where is whey contained and what does it do for you?. Milk is made of two proteins, casein and whey and right here we are going to focus on whey. Casein would come later. Whey protein can be separated from the casein in milk or formed as a by-product of cheese making.

Whey protein is considered a complete protein and contains all 9 essential amino acids and is low in lactose content. People commonly use it as a supplement, alongside resistance exercise, to help improve muscle protein synthesis and promote the growth of lean tissue mass.

Whey protein is a mixture of the following:

*Beta-lactoglobulin
*Alpha-lactalbumin
*Bovine serum albumin
*Immunoglobins.

Whey Protein Types:

There are three primary types of whey protein :
Whey protein concentrate (WPC), 
Whey protein isolate (WPI), and 
Whey protein hydrolysate (WPH). 

Whey protein concentrate : WPC contains low levels of fat and low levels of carbohydrates (lactose). The percentage of protein in WPC depends on how concentrated it is. Lower end concentrates tend to have 30% protein and higher end up to 90%

Whey protein isolate:  WPIs are further processed to remove all the fat and lactose. WPI is usually at least 90% protein

Whey protein hydrolysate: WPH is considered to be the “predigested” form of whey protein as it has already undergone partial hydrolysis – a process necessary for the body to absorb protein. WPH doesn’t require as much digestion as the other two forms of whey protein. In addition, it is commonly used in medical protein supplements and infant formulas because of it’s improved digestibility and reduced allergen potential.

How is whey protein produced?

When milk is left over and coagulates, it eventually turns into a 5% solution of lactose in water, loaded with minerals. This leftover by-product, called whey, makes up 20% of the protein in milk, the other 80% is called casein (the curds in cottage cheese). The liquid whey is separated from the casein and sent through filters to remove all non-whey ingredients. It is then purified in a process called “ion exchange”.

The final step is removing the water from the whey by turning it into a powder at a drying tower. The protein powder is then ready to be packaged and consumed.

Possible Health Benefits of Whey Protein

There are many benefits associated with the consumption of whey protein, and researchers are constantly finding new possible therapeutic properties. Please Note that many of these potential benefits are based on single studies and more evidence is required before making definitive judgement.

Whey Protein Promotes Muscle Growth

Muscle mass naturally declines with age. This usually leads to fat gain and raises the risk of many chronic diseases associated with obessity including high blood pressure and diabetes. However, this adverse change in body composition can be partly slowed, prevented, or reversed with a combination of proper exercise and adequate diet. Strength training coupled with the consumption of high-protein foods or protein supplements has been shown to be an effective preventive strategy. Particularly effective are high-quality protein sources, such as whey, which is rich in a branched-chain amino acid called leucine which is the most growth-promoting (anabolic) of the amino acids.

For this reason, whey protein is effective for the prevention of age-related muscle loss, as well as for improved strength and a better-looking body. Whey protein has been shown to be slightly better compared to other types of protein, such as casein or soy.

Lowering Cholesterol

According to a study published in The British Journal of Nutrition, “there was a significant decrease in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol at week 12 in the whey group compared with the casein (group).”

Asthma

Whey protein could improve immune response in children with asthma. A study  published in the International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition, found that children with asthma who were supplemented with whey for one month had an improved cytokine response.

Whey Protein May Lower Blood Pressure

Abnormally high blood pressure (hypertension) is one of the leading risk factors for heart disease and numerous studies have linked the consumption of dairy products with reduced blood pressure. This effect could been attributed to a family of bioactive peptides in milk, so-called “angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors” (ACE-inhibitors). In whey proteins, the ACE-inhibitors are called lactokinins. Several animal studies have demonstrated their beneficial effects on blood pressure.

A limited number of human studies have investigated the effect of whey proteins on blood pressure anyway, and many experts consider the evidence to be inconclusive. One study in overweight individuals showed that whey protein supplementation, 54 g/day for 12 weeks, lowered systolic blood pressure by 4%. Casein  has similar effects .

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Whey Protein May Enhance the Body’s Antioxidant Defenses

Antioxidants are substances that act against oxidation in the body, reducing oxidative stress and cutting the risk of various chronic diseases. One of the most important antioxidants in humans is glutathione.

Unlike most antioxidants we get from the diet, glutathione is produced by the body. In the body, glutathione production depends on the supply of several amino acids, such as cysteine, which is sometimes of limited supply. For this reason, high-cysteine foods, such as whey protein, may boost the body’s natural antioxidant defenses . A number of studies in both humans and rodents have discovered that whey proteins may reduce oxidative stress and increase levels of glutathione 

Whey Protein is Highly Satiating (Filling), Which May Help Reduce Hunger and Aid Weight Loss.

Satiety is a term used to describe the feeling of fullness we experience after eating a meal. It is the opposite of appetite and hunger, and should suppress cravings for food and the desire to eat. Some foods are more satiating than others, an effect which is partly mediated by their macronutrient (protein, carb, fat) composition of which protein is by far the most filling of the three. However, not all proteins have the same effect on satiety. Whey protein appears to be more satiating than other types of protein, such as casein and soy.
These properties make it particularly useful for those who need to eat fewer calories and lose weight.

A study published in the journal Clinical and Investigative Medicine1 found that whey protein may help reduce weight loss among HIV-positive patients.

Recent developments on whey protein:

The beneficial effects of whey on diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors in obese adults
New evidence shores up findings that whey protein, which is found in milk and cheese, could have health benefits for people who are obese and do not yet have diabetes. The study, which appears in ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research, examined how different protein sources affect metabolism.
*Whey protein consumption may lead to significant decreases in body weight and body fat and significant increases in lean body mass .

*Research published in the March/April 2014 issue of the Journal of the American College of Nutrition showed that whey protein, either as a supplement combined with resistance exercise or as part of a weight-loss or weight-maintenance diet, may provide men and women benefits related to body composition.

*Researchers from Tel Aviv University have suggested that consuming whey protein before meals may reduce blood sugar spikes. Specifically, they state that a whey protein drink before breakfast can help control erratic glucose levels associated with type 2 diabetes.

Whey Protein Risks?

Generally, most of the complications associated with whey protein intake have to do with digestive issues, such as bloating, headaches, cramps and fatigue. None of these are generally considered life-threatening, more so than annoying complications. Most of the literature has shown that if you’re experiencing any of have these symptoms, they are most likely due to either the lactose (found more in Whey Protein Concentrate) or sweeteners used more so than the whey protein itself. With that said, there are different methods of whey production, such as ion-exchanged that can influence how well your body can utilize the protein, leading to improper digestion of the whey itself.

The biggest fear often expressed about whey protein intake is that too much protein is “bad for the kidneys.” Research though has shown this is not true at all in healthy individuals. For those with known kidney disease, high protein diets can exacerbate pre-existing conditions. Healthy individuals, without any underlying or unknown kidney disease have nothing to worry about with higher intakes of protein. What does occur with higher protein intakes is your body adapts to the increase in protein by increasing glomerular filtration rates (which means more fluid passes by your kidneys and there’s an increase in urine production).

Sources:

https://draxe.com/casein-protein/

https://authoritynutrition.com/10-health-benefits-of-whey-protein/

http://www.builtlean.com/2012/03/16/whey-protein/

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/263371.php?page=2

read more